Best thrillers in movie history – liherald.com

Wednesday, October 26, 2022
Complete forecast
Brie Larson looking down and fearful in the 2015 thriller "Room"

Element Pictures

Representing the best of all worlds, quality cinematic thrillers pair edge-of-your-seat suspense with genuine human conflict. Throw in a little mystery, some taut action sequences, and the occasional romantic encounter, and it’s no wonder the genre remains so wildly popular year after year. Thrillers are also less tethered to formula or tone than something like straight horror or comedy, lending them far more range to showcase.
Despite the genre’s wide-reaching parameters, however, most thrillers tend to emphasize the human element. As a result, viewers are more inclined to care about the characters and invest in the story. Not only that, but because thrillers often weave a more intricate narrative, the best ones reveal additional layers of meaning and detail with every viewing, making them compulsively watchable over and over again. And who doesn’t love a movie that they can watch multiple times?
As with any genre, not all thrillers are created equal. Some explode with pure movie magic while others fail to light even the weakest fuse. Stacker is celebrating the former, listing out the 100 best thrillers in movie history. For analysis, we’ve built an index (the “Stacker score”) that compiles IMDb ratings (weighted 50%) and Metacritic scores (weighted 50%). To qualify, the film had to be listed as a thriller on IMDb, have a Metascore, and have at least 5,000 votes. Ties were broken by the number of IMDb votes. Every film on the list has been considered according to cinematic history and the development of thrillers.
Click through to see if your favorite thriller made it to Stacker’s list.
You may also like: Mistakes from the 50 best movies of all time
A girl in a long dress with flowers around her neck and on her head with a clown holding her hands behind her back.

British Lion Film Corporation

– Director: Robin Hardy
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 87
– IMDb user rating: 7.5
– Runtime: 88 minutes
A British police sergeant pays a call to the island of Summerisle, searching for a missing girl. When he arrives on the island, he discovers that its residents have forsaken Christianity to practice a form of Celtic paganism. The film was based on the David Pinner novel “Ritual,” and was remade in 2006 starring Nicolas Cage.
Al Pacino with blurred out people in the background.

Touchstone Pictures

– Director: Michael Mann
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 84
– IMDb user rating: 7.8
– Runtime: 157 minutes
Sometimes a thriller doesn’t need to go big on explosions or mysteries in order to retain an atmosphere of suspense. For proof, look no further than Michael Mann’s “The Insider,” about a chemist’s harrowing attempt to expose Big Tobacco by appearing on “60 Minutes.” The film is based on the real-life story of Jeffrey Wigand, who visited set only twice but asked Mann to ensure smoking would not be glamorized. His request was granted.
Benicio Del Toro wearing aviator sunglasses in a car talking to someone at his window.

Compulsion Inc.

– Director: Steven Soderbergh
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 86
– IMDb user rating: 7.6
– Runtime: 147 minutes
A film of ever-shifting perspectives, “Traffic” tells the story of the illegal drug trade through the eyes of everyone involved—traffickers, enforcers, politicians, and users. A powerful narrative is emboldened by an impressive cast, including Don Cheadle, Benicio del Toro, Michael Douglas, Erika Christensen, Luis Guzman, Dennis Quaid, Catherine Zeta-Jones, James Brolin, and many others. Originally, 20th Century Fox demanded that Harrison Ford play a leading role, but Steven Soderbergh refused. USA Films picked up the project.
A man in a black suit and tie stands in a greek style building looking up at something.

Tornasol Films

– Director: Juan José Campanella
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 80
– IMDb user rating: 8.2
– Runtime: 129 minutes
A retired investigator (Ricardo Darín) looks into an unsolved murder case and cracks open new leads in this Argentine thriller. With its complex characters and intelligent plot twists, the story rises well above the standard genre fare. It won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Film and inspired a 2015 American remake.
Kevin Spacey, Jamie Foxx, and Jon Hamm in a warehouse at a table with a chalk board behind them.

TriStar Pictures

– Director: Edgar Wright
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 86
– IMDb user rating: 7.6
– Runtime: 113 minutes
Bank heists are to the thriller genre what haunted houses are to the horror genre, yet that didn’t stop filmmaker Edgar Wright from infusing “Baby Driver” with its own distinct vibe. The movie is about a young getaway driver with a passion for music who gets wrangled into pulling off an impossible job. To research the film, Wright befriended real-life ex-convict Joe Loya, author of “The Man Who Outgrew His Prison Cell.”
Two men facing each other in front of a tree with one holding a martini and the other holding a camera.

Universal Pictures

– Director: Jordan Peele
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 85
– IMDb user rating: 7.7
– Runtime: 104 minutes
Still fresh on everyone’s minds is Jordan Peele’s “Get Out,” the 2017 thriller about a Black photographer who visits his white girlfriend’s family and unwittingly gets ensnared in a diabolical scheme. As one might imagine, the film is rife with racial overtones and comic jabs at upper-crust society. However, there are also some less obvious references to America’s history of racism. For instance, a teacup and spoon play an essential role in the film, alluding to the slavery era, when enslavers would use a teacup and spoon to summon an enslaved person.
Harvey Keitel and Michael Madsen wearing black suits and looking into the trunk of a car.

Live Entertainment

– Director: Quentin Tarantino
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 79
– IMDb user rating: 8.3
– Runtime: 99 minutes
This taut crime thriller made a splash at Sundance and turned director Quentin Tarantino into an overnight sensation. With an ensemble that includes Harvey Keitel, Steve Buscemi, Tim Roth, Michael Madsen, Chris Penn, and Lawrence Tierney, the story depicts a group of criminals that must figure out who to trust in the wake of a robbery gone awry. The film’s gritty characters, gut-punching violence, and unforgettable dialogue helped usher in a new era of cinema at large.
Kevin Spacey and Stephen Baldwin walking down a hallway in jumpsuits with guns.

PolyGram Filmed Entertainment

– Director: Bryan Singer
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 77
– IMDb user rating: 8.5
– Runtime: 106 minutes
Nothing is what it seems in this Oscar-winning crime drama, which centers around a deadly heist. A lone survivor (Kevin Spacey) recounts his twisty tale and a cocky detective (Chazz Palminteri) hangs on every word. The name Keyser Söze has been part of the cultural lexicon ever since.
Leonardo DiCaprio and Elliot Page stand inside an elevator with an iron gate looking out.

Warner Bros.

– Director: Christopher Nolan
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 74
– IMDb user rating: 8.8
– Runtime: 148 minutes
Christopher Nolan’s labyrinthian thriller follows a group of thieves as they hack into the dream world of their latest target. Raking in more than $826 million worldwide at the box office, this is the rare example of a modern blockbuster that’s not based on preexisting material or part of a larger franchise. It also found awards success as a Best Picture nominee at the Academy Awards, taking home four Oscars.
A man in a white t-shirt looks at a computer screen with a woman and child on a couch in the background.

Rock Films

– Director: Yuriy Bykov
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 83
– IMDb user rating: 8.0
– Runtime: 116 minutes
Convinced of an impending building collapse, a simple plumber (Artyom Bystrov) must overcome corrupt politicians in this timely Russian thriller. Its title is a gesture of futility in that the protagonist is a fool for taking on the local government. Similarly bleak is the film’s portrayal of daily Russian life.
Two men in suits talk with a man sitting at a desk wearing a top hat.

Walter Wanger Productions

– Director: Alfred Hitchcock
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 88
– IMDb user rating: 7.5
– Runtime: 120 minutes
Alfred Hitchcock’s heralded spy thriller takes place on the brink of WWII and stars Joel McCrea as New York crime reporter John Jones. Sent to Europe as a foreign correspondent, Jones uncovers a treacherous spy ring. Time Out critic Geoff Andrew called it a “thoroughly enjoyable affair, complete with some of [Hitchcock’s] most memorable set pieces.”
Marilyn Monroe answering the door to a man in a coat and hat.

MGM

– Director: John Huston
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 85
– IMDb user rating: 7.8
– Runtime: 112 minutes
This black-and-white thriller set an early template for the heist subgenre, following various thieves as they plot and execute a dangerous robbery. Unforeseen problems and deadly double crosses ensue through a series of tightly controlled shots. The novel upon which it’s based inspired a number of other adaptations, including the 1972 blaxploitation film “Cool Breeze.”
Dustin Hoffman and Robert Redford sit on top of desks in an office.

Warner Bros.

– Director: Alan J. Pakula
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 84
– IMDb user rating: 7.9
– Runtime: 138 minutes
From the annals of great journalism movies comes 1976’s “All the President’s Men,” the story of two reporters who blow the lid off the Watergate scandal. While the movie goes to great lengths to preserve the integrity of the book upon which it was based, it does take some liberties in the dialogue department. More to the point, the film introduced the phrase “follow the money,” which is now part of the national lexicon.
A man walking down a rural road in the fog with a scarecrow in the foreground.

Sidus

– Director: Bong Joon-ho
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 82
– IMDb user rating: 8.1
– Runtime: 132 minutes
Long before he rocked the world with “Parasite,” South Korean director Bong Joon-ho crafted this acclaimed mystery drama. Set in 1986, it follows a team of detectives as they hunt for a sadistic serial killer. The story is loosely based on the real-life Hwaseong murders, considered South Korea’s first serial killer case.
Tom Cruise scaling the side of a mountain.

Paramount Pictures

– Director: Christopher McQuarrie
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 86
– IMDb user rating: 7.7
– Runtime: 147 minutes
Ethan Hunt is back for the sixth chapter in the “Mission: Impossible” franchise, this time teaming up with a CIA assassin to prevent an even greater disaster. The sixth film was discussed before the release of the fifth film, “Rogue Nation,” which was also directed by Christopher McQuarrie, making him the only “Mission: Impossible” director to direct more than one film in the franchise.
Sean Penn yelling and being held back by police officers.

Warner Bros.

– Director: Clint Eastwood
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 84
– IMDb user rating: 7.9
– Runtime: 138 minutes
Ex-con Jimmy Markum’s daughter is dead, and it turns out two of his childhood friends are involved: one was the last person to see her alive, and the other is the homicide detective working on the case. Not only was the film directed by Clint Eastwood, but the Hollywood icon also wrote the film’s score.
Clive Owen stands at the bottom of a flight of stairs protecting a young woman holding a baby with military men lining the stairs.

Universal Pictures

– Director: Alfonso Cuarón
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 84
– IMDb user rating: 7.9
– Runtime: 109 minutes
In a desolate future where humans are unable to reproduce, a miracle arrives in the form of a pregnancy. So goes the premise for “Children of Men,” a propulsive thriller based on a book of the same name. Among the movie’s many iconic scenes is a pig floating over the Battersea Power Station, making direct reference to the Pink Floyd album “Animals.”
Ben Affleck, with long hair and a beard, walks through a busy crowd.

Warner Bros.

– Director: Ben Affleck
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 86
– IMDb user rating: 7.7
– Runtime: 120 minutes
To save six American hostages, CIA agents enter Tehran disguised as a Hollywood production crew in 2012’s “Argo.” Directed by Ben Affleck, the movie is based on a real-life hostage crisis that occurred in 1979. While the film does strive for authenticity, it reportedly overlooks Canada’s involvement in the rescue mission, which in real life was quite significant.
Uma Thurman driving a convertible at night with light on her face.

Miramax

– Director: Quentin Tarantino
– Stacker score: 88
– Metascore: 83
– IMDb user rating: 8.0
– Runtime: 137 minutes
Tarantino’s epic saga concludes with this second installment, in which The Bride (Uma Thurman) forges a bloody path of revenge. A series of violent showdowns paves the way for her final confrontation with Bill, played by martial arts legend David Carradine. The film made just over $154 million at the worldwide box office on a reported budget of $30 million.
Two men in black and white stare at each other, one clutching a young boy at his feet.

London Film Productions

– Director: Carol Reed
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 88
– IMDb user rating: 7.6
– Runtime: 95 minutes
Phillipe is the young son of a diplomat who finds himself alone much of the time and takes a strong liking to the house butler, Baines. When Baines is wrongly accused of his wife’s death, Phillipe is desperate to come to his rescue. The film was critically acclaimed upon its release in Britain, and Carol Reed was nominated for the Best Director Oscar.
A man in a long dark coat walks through a quiet city square next to a clocktower at night.

Two Cities Films

– Director: Carol Reed
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 87
– IMDb user rating: 7.7
– Runtime: 116 minutes
Best known for the noirish classic “The Third Man,” director Carol Reed also helmed this British crime thriller of similar esteem. After a robbery gone wrong, a wounded Irish nationalist leader (James Mason) tries to avoid capture in Belfast. The film won the BAFTA Award for Best British Film and received an Oscar nomination for its film editing.
A man with a scar on his cheek points a long gun hidden in wrapped paper with two other men standing by his side.

The Caddo Company

– Directors: Howard Hawks, Richard Rosson
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 87
– IMDb user rating: 7.7
– Runtime: 93 minutes
A ruthless hitman (Paul Muni) climbs his way up the criminal ladder in this gangster drama, set during Prohibition. It drew inspiration from real-life mobster Al Capone, who was nicknamed Scarface by the press. The film was loosely remade in 1983 as an ultra-violent crime epic starring Al Pacino.
A man stands behind frosted glass holding both hands up.

Rizzoli Film

– Director: Dario Argento
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 89
– IMDb user rating: 7.5
– Runtime: 127 minutes
“Deep Red” is a 1975 Italian horror film about a murdered psychic medium and a musician who feels compelled to solve the case. It’s classified under the genre of “giallo,” which means yellow in Italian, named after a series of mystery novels with yellow covers that were popular in Italy.
Clint Eastwood, wearing a sweater vest and blazer, walks down a wrecked city street with a gun by his side.

Warner Bros.

– Directors: Don Siegel, Clint Eastwood
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 87
– IMDb user rating: 7.7
– Runtime: 102 minutes
Known for its uncompromising depiction of violence and equally uncompromising lead character, “Dirty Harry” stars Clint Eastwood as a San Francisco cop assigned to track down “the Scorpio Killer.” Helping Eastwood perform the job is a fearless attitude and a silver .44 Magnum revolver. In many ways, this seminal film expanded upon the persona Eastwood had developed in classic Westerns, where he likewise took an “ends justifies the means” approach toward the pursuit of justice.
Sean Connery standing on a mountain road next to a classic sports car looking down at something.

Eon Productions

– Director: Guy Hamilton
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 87
– IMDb user rating: 7.7
– Runtime: 110 minutes
The third James Bond film to ever be made, “Goldfinger,” was based on the 1959 Ian Fleming novel of the same name. It stars Sean Connery as the suave secret agent investigating a gold smuggling plan set to contaminate the U.S. Bullion Depository at Fort Knox. The movie had a budget of $3 million ($28 million with inflation), which was the budget of “Dr. No” and “From Russia with Love” (the movie’s predecessors) combined.
Jeff Bridges and Chris Pine, holding a gun,  on the front porch of a house in the country.

Sidney Kimmel Entertainment

– Director: David Mackenzie
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 88
– IMDb user rating: 7.6
– Runtime: 102 minutes
Combining a simple premise with poignant social commentary, 2016’s “Hell or High Water” tells the story of two brothers who rob banks to save their ranch. Screenwriter Taylor Sheridan was partly inspired to write the film after visiting his hometown and seeing nothing but closed storefronts and empty houses.
Gael García Bernal in a black and red adidas shirt staring seriously at a man with blonde hair and an earring who is in his face.

Altavista Films

– Director: Alejandro G. Iñárritu
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 83
– IMDb user rating: 8.1
– Runtime: 154 minutes
Alejandro González Iñárritu’s feature directorial debut delivers overlapping narratives in the vein of “Pulp Fiction.” Each story takes place in Mexico City and connects various characters through a tragic car accident. It makes up part of the director’s “Trilogy of Death.”
A tall person wearing a white mask holding a knife in the air.

Compass International Pictures

– Director: John Carpenter
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 87
– IMDb user rating: 7.7
– Runtime: 91 minutes
Folks might consider John Carpenter’s 1978 classic “Halloween” to be straight horror. However, the film about a homicidal maniac who terrorizes his hometown actually touts more suspense than it does gore. That feature and a slow-burn narrative easily qualify this film as a thriller—one of the best of its kind.
Laura Harring and Naomi Watts both with short blonde hair crying.

Les Films Alain Sarde

– Director: David Lynch
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 85
– IMDb user rating: 7.9
– Runtime: 147 minutes
Composed of a series of vignettes, “Mulholland Drive” ultimately follows the main story of Betty Elms, an aspiring actress in Los Angeles who befriends a woman recovering from a car accident and suffering from amnesia. The psychological thriller was originally created with the potential for a television series. However, ABC ultimately pulled the plug, so David Lynch reshaped it as a feature film.
Guy Pearce with spikey blonde hair holding open his blue button down shirt reavealing writing all over his upper body.

New Market Capital Group

– Director: Christopher Nolan
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 80
– IMDb user rating: 8.4
– Runtime: 113 minutes
The thriller that turned director Christopher Nolan into a household name still ranks among his best work. Unfolding both forward and backward, it puts a man (Guy Pearce) with short-term memory loss on the trail of his wife’s killer. Nolan’s brother Jonathan wrote the short story upon which the film is based.
You may also like: 50 best movies about the Vietnam War
Jack Nicholson smiling at a dark haired woman in front of a mint green van.

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

– Director: Michelangelo Antonioni
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 90
– IMDb user rating: 7.5
– Runtime: 126 minutes
While on assignment in North Africa, journalist David Locke discovers the body of a stranger who looks just like him. Locke assumes the man’s identity, only to discover that the man was entwined in illegal arms dealing. The most iconic scene of the film is a seven-minute continuous shot at the end of the movie that sweeps from inside a hotel room to the piazza outside.
A nicely dressed man and woman stand in a doorway on a porch with a darkly lit figure at the bottom of the stairs looking at them.

RKO Radio Pictures

– Director: Jacques Tourneur
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 85
– IMDb user rating: 8.0
– Runtime: 97 minutes
This quintessential noir stars Robert Mitchum as a former private eye turned small-town gas station owner, whose violent past comes back with a vengeance. “Each change of angle and shift of light evokes an inner disturbance,” wrote New Yorker critic Richard Brody of the film’s atmospheric style.
Three young adults sit in lawn chairs with wine glasses on a table outside a house in the sunshine.

Pine House Film

– Director: Lee Chang-dong
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 90
– IMDb user rating: 7.5
– Runtime: 148 minutes
Out of South Korea comes this acclaimed psychological thriller with socioeconomic themes. Convinced that his friend (Jeon Jong-seo) is missing or dead, a struggling writer (Yoo Ah-in) suspects a wealthy young man (Steven Yeun) of foul play. It premiered at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival and took home two awards, including the esteemed FIPRESCI Prize.
A tall man in a suit points a gun at Lauren Bacall and Humphrey Bogart sitting on a couch with a woman looking on in the background.

Warner Bros.

– Director: Howard Hawks
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 86
– IMDb user rating: 7.9
– Runtime: 114 minutes
This classic noir adapts a novel of the same name and stars Humphrey Bogart as private detective Philip Marlowe. Hired by a wealthy general, Marlowe finds himself embroiled in a deadly blackmailing plot. Bogart’s real-life wife and frequent co-star Lauren Bacall appears as the general’s daughter, who has some secrets of her own.
Gene Hackman wearing a suit and glasses, doing something to a toilet with a toolbox.

Directors Company, The

– Director: Francis Ford Coppola
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 87
– IMDb user rating: 7.8
– Runtime: 113 minutes
In between making “The Godfather” and “The Godfather Part II,” Francis Ford Coppola released this comparatively modest but effectively unnerving film about a surveillance expert who thinks his next targets are going to be murdered. The highly acclaimed movie won the Palme d’Or at Cannes and was nominated for three Academy Awards, including Best Picture. It would ultimately suffer defeat in the Best Picture category to “The Godfather Part II,” making 1974 an excellent year for Coppola.
You may also like: Top 25 LGBTQ+ films, according to critics
Two young women in black and white maid uniforms walk down a hallway.

CJ Entertainment

– Director: Park Chan-wook
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 84
– IMDb user rating: 8.1
– Runtime: 145 minutes
Revenge is served all sorts of ways in this Korean erotic thriller. Directed by Park Chan-wook, class tension and politics are central themes in the story of a con man who teams up with a pickpocket to swindle a wealthy man and his niece out of their money. The film is based on a Victorian-era novel titled “Fingersmith.” Chan-wook’s version is set in Korea during the Japanese occupation.
Adam Sandler stands behind a jewelry counter while two men look at jewels with a magnifying glass.

A24

– Directors: Benny Safdie, Josh Safdie
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 91
– IMDb user rating: 7.4
– Runtime: 135 minutes
A Jewish American jeweler with a gambling problem makes a high-stakes bet that could clear his crippling debt if he wins. The lead was played by Adam Sandler, who blew critics out of the water. It was the role of a lifetime that almost never was, as Sandler didn’t even read the script the first two times the directors approached him, according to Vox.
Tommy Lee Jones points at something at the bottom of a dam with Joe Pantoliano and Daniel Roebuck as police officers in the background.

Warner Bros.

– Director: Andrew Davis
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 87
– IMDb user rating: 7.8
– Runtime: 130 minutes
Harrison Ford plays a falsely accused murderer on the run in “The Fugitive,” which was based on a TV series of the same name. The film delivers no shortage of memorable dialogue, an impressive feat given the fact that the actors improvised many of their lines.
Matt Damon with a serious look on his face wearing headphones.

Universal Pictures

– Director: Paul Greengrass
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 85
– IMDb user rating: 8.0
– Runtime: 115 minutes
Director Paul Greengrass and star Matt Damon deliver nonstop thrills and lots of shaky-cam action in “The Bourne Ultimatum,” the third in a series of Jason Bourne movies. In the film, Bourne narrowly escapes the wrath of a CIA boss and his various assassins, all while searching for the truth behind his own life as a trained killer.
Harrison Ford sweating and pointing a gun.

The Ladd Company

– Director: Ridley Scott
– Stacker score: 89
– Metascore: 84
– IMDb user rating: 8.1
– Runtime: 117 minutes
In the midst of the initial “Star Wars” craze came Ridley Scott’s “Blade Runner,” a noirish take on sci-fi that’s earned itself a healthy fan base over the years. In the film, Harrison Ford stars as a bounty hunter who must find and terminate a group of escaped replicants. Everything from the music to the characters to the set pieces is bursting with style and distinction, lending the film a breathtaking aesthetic all its own.
You may also like: Incredible filming locations from popular movies
A man in a tweed coat next to a woman in a white dress.

Alfred J. Hitchcock Productions

– Director: Alfred Hitchcock
– Stacker score: 90
– Metascore: 92
– IMDb user rating: 7.4
– Runtime: 116 minutes
London is at the mercy of a serial killer who uses a necktie to strangle his victims. When the ex-wife of an ex-Royal Air Force officer is found dead, the officer becomes a suspect and is forced to go on the lam. Critics like Roger Ebert (who gave the film four stars) considered it a triumphant return to thrillers for Hitchcock.
Rosanna Arquette in a white fitted dress with a thin brown belt.

The Geffen Company

– Director: Martin Scorsese
– Stacker score: 90
– Metascore: 90
– IMDb user rating: 7.6
– Runtime: 97 minutes
Paul Hackett is a New York City word processor who meets a woman in a cafe one night and takes a taxi down to her apartment. The rest of the movie is a series of unfortunate, awkward, and sometimes dangerous situations as he tries to make his way back uptown. At the time, the movie was the first Martin Scorsese film in 10 years to not include Robert De Niro as the lead.
Two young men look worried on an airplane.

Universal Pictures

– Director: Paul Greengrass
– Stacker score: 90
– Metascore: 90
– IMDb user rating: 7.6
– Runtime: 111 minutes
“United 93” puts viewers on one of the flights hijacked by terrorists during the Sept. 11 attacks. The film, counting down in real-time, takes us into the seats with the passengers and crew, as well as with their loved ones. The film was made with the permission and cooperation of all of the passengers’ families. Many of the actors spent time with family members while researching their individual roles.
Al Pacino stares intently at a man wearing a suit and holding a long gun.

Warner Bros.

– Director: Sidney Lumet
– Stacker score: 90
– Metascore: 86
– IMDb user rating: 8.0
– Runtime: 125 minutes
As much a comedy and a drama as it is a thriller, 1975’s “Dog Day Afternoon” is based on the true story of a man who robs a bank to pay for his partner’s gender confirmation surgery. What follows is a media circus for the ages. Al Pacino stars in the lead role and bears a striking resemblance to his real-life counterpart.
Frances McDormand and another police officer stand outside in the snow sipping coffee and talking next to a scene.

PolyGram Filmed Entertainment

– Directors: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
– Stacker score: 90
– Metascore: 85
– IMDb user rating: 8.1
– Runtime: 98 minutes
While the premise of a man who hires two criminals to abduct his wife might sound like standard Hollywood fare, 1996’s “Fargo” is quite unlike any other film of its kind. Arguably the Coen brothers’ most quintessential work, this movie performed well at the box office and even spawned a hit TV series on FX. But the FX series actually marks the second time “Fargo” was adapted for the small screen—before that came a TV adaptation in 1997, which was passed over by networks.
You may also like: 25 iconic closing shots from film history
A woman crouched down in a corner with stuff spilled all over the floor.

Compton Films

– Director: Roman Polanski
– Stacker score: 90
– Metascore: 91
– IMDb user rating: 7.6
– Runtime: 105 minutes
Carole is a young manicurist who suffers from a pathological fear of interacting with men. When her sister, who is also her roommate, leaves for a vacation, Carole is left alone in the apartment to further succumb to her psychological entrapments. Roman Polanski got the idea for “Repulsion” after abandoning Poland for London, notes Charles Silver, the curator of the Department of Film at MoMA.
Julie Christie and Donald Sutherland talking in front of a brick archway.

Casey Productions

– Director: Nicolas Roeg
– Stacker score: 90
– Metascore: 95
– IMDb user rating: 7.2
– Runtime: 110 minutes
Director Nicolas Roeg employed radical editing techniques and an infamous sex scene when bringing this giallo-esque horror to life. After the tragic death of their daughter, a married couple (Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie) experience a series of potentially supernatural phenomena. Themes of grief and obsession are at the heart of the film.
A man running next to a truck labeled as explosive.

CICC

– Director: Henri-Georges Clouzot
– Stacker score: 90
– Metascore: 85
– IMDb user rating: 8.2
– Runtime: 131 minutes
This gripping French thriller follows four men as they transport volatile nitroglycerine across rugged and perilous terrain. It was later remade by director William Friedkin as the 1977 cult classic “Sorcerer.” The film’s prolonged suspense sequences also inspired director Christopher Nolan when he was making “Dunkirk.”
A woman in black with a bloody nose standing close to the face of another woman up against a wall.

American International Pictures (AIP)

– Director: Ingmar Bergman
– Stacker score: 90
– Metascore: 86
– IMDb user rating: 8.1
– Runtime: 83 minutes
In this complete mind-meld of a film, director Ingmar Bergman tells the story of a young nurse and her patient, who has unexpectedly stopped speaking. The two relocate to a remote cottage where the lines between the pair begin to blur to the point where the nurse has trouble distinguishing herself from her patient. Often thought to be Bergman’s masterpiece, the film touched on almost every controversial subject out there, from abortion and family relationships to sexuality and even vampire mythology.
Zombies storming a house.

Image Ten

– Director: George A. Romero
– Stacker score: 90
– Metascore: 89
– IMDb user rating: 7.8
– Runtime: 96 minutes
Made on a reported budget of just $114,000—most of which was secured after shooting began—Romero’s feature debut became a midnight box office smash. Multiple sequels would follow, as would an entire subgenre of zombie fare. Fun fact: the word “zombie” is never once uttered in this film.
You may also like: Why these famous films were banned around the globe
Two men wearing suits and sitting together on a train.

Warner Bros.

– Director: Alfred Hitchcock
– Stacker score: 90
– Metascore: 88
– IMDb user rating: 7.9
– Runtime: 101 minutes
Alfred Hitchcock continues to reign over this list, this time with 1951’s “Strangers on a Train.” Adapted from a novel by Patricia Highsmith, the premise deals with two men who agree to swap murders to forge stronger alibis. Mystery writer Raymond Chandler wrote an early draft of the screenplay, but virtually nothing from the draft would make it onto the big screen. However, Warner Bros. insisted on giving Chandler screenwriting credit as a marketing ploy.
A man and woman embracing one another looking scared.

Selznick International Pictures

– Director: Alfred Hitchcock
– Stacker score: 90
– Metascore: 86
– IMDb user rating: 8.1
– Runtime: 130 minutes
More thrillers mean more Hitchcock, and 1940’s “Rebecca” finds the master in top form. The film centers on a newlywed woman who moves in with her recently widowed husband and finds herself unable to escape the looming presence of his deceased former wife. This is the only Hitchcock film to win Best Picture at the Academy Awards.
Brie Larson and a young boy sit on the floor reading together in a small bedroom.

Element Pictures

– Director: Lenny Abrahamson
– Stacker score: 90
– Metascore: 86
– IMDb user rating: 8.1
– Runtime: 118 minutes
Brie Larson gives an Oscar-winning performance in this adaptation of a novel by Emma Donoghue, who also penned the script. Confined to a small room, a kidnap victim (Larson) must raise her young son (Jacob Tremblay) while plotting their escape. But even if they survive, are they psychologically prepared for the world outside their door?
A man on a hospital bed surrounded by men in suits.

Valoria Films

– Director: Costa-Gavras
– Stacker score: 91
– Metascore: 86
– IMDb user rating: 8.2
– Runtime: 127 minutes
This Algerian-French thriller surmounted various hurdles on its way to production and went on to win two Academy Awards, including Best Foreign Language Film. Culling inspiration from real-life events, it centers around a political assassination and the subsequent military cover-up. Legendary New Yorker critic Pauline Kael called it “a political thriller that builds up so much tension that you’ll probably feel all knotted up by the time it’s over.”
Humphrey Bogart wearing a ship captain

#N/A

– Director: Howard Hawks
– Stacker score: 91
– Metascore: 90
– IMDb user rating: 7.8
– Runtime: 100 minutes
Inspired by an Ernest Hemingway novel, this WWII adventure also plays like an unofficial sequel to “Casablanca.” Humphrey Bogart stars as a boat operator on the island of Martinique, who begrudgingly helps the French Resistance. During production, Bogart forged an off-screen romance with frequent collaborator and soon-to-be wife Lauren Bacall.
You may also like: Most widely watched but universally hated movies of all time
Robert De Niro, Harvey Keitel, and David Proval standing next to a pool table.

Warner Bros.

– Director: Martin Scorsese
– Stacker score: 91
– Metascore: 96
– IMDb user rating: 7.2
– Runtime: 112 minutes
Showing off the more classic (and career-defining) side of Robert De Niro is Martin Scorsese’s “Mean Streets,” in which the actor plays a psychotic troublemaker. The movie also stars Harvey Keitel as a small-time hoodlum trying to make his way up the mob ladder. Scorsese made the film on a shoestring budget of $500,000, allegedly spending most of the money on music for the soundtrack.
A man in a gray uniform holds a gun to another man in a suit.

Mirisch Company, The

– Director: John Sturges
– Stacker score: 91
– Metascore: 86
– IMDb user rating: 8.2
– Runtime: 172 minutes
Putting actor Steve McQueen in a POW escape movie is virtually guaranteeing one of the best thrillers of all time. That movie was “The Great Escape,” and it features McQueen leading a group of allies out of a German internment camp. Charles Bronson stars as the chief tunneler, drawing upon his previous experiences as a coal miner for the role.
Richard Dreyfuss, Roy Scheider, and Robert Shaw in a boat looking at something in the water.

Zanuck/Brown Productions

– Director: Steven Spielberg
– Stacker score: 91
– Metascore: 87
– IMDb user rating: 8.1
– Runtime: 124 minutes
The original blockbuster, 1975’s “Jaws” pits a great white shark against unsuspecting locals and tourists in a small coastal town. As most are aware, this film made director Steven Spielberg a household name, though what is less commonly known is the fact that he wasn’t the studio’s first choice. The director who was originally attached was fired after he kept referring to the shark as a whale during production meetings.
Sigourney Weaver fighting an alien.

Twentieth Century Fox

– Director: James Cameron
– Stacker score: 91
– Metascore: 84
– IMDb user rating: 8.4
– Runtime: 137 minutes
In 1979, Ridley Scott terrified audiences with “Alien,” and in 1986, James Cameron delivered “Aliens,” a sequel that cranked up the action while toning down the horror. Cameron would later become well known for his authoritative methodology, but at the time, he was considered a novice, which made it hard for him to earn the respect of his assistant director and the film crew alike. In response, Cameron had the assistant director replaced, quashing a potential uprising.
Jake Gyllenhaal stabbing a mirror with a knife.

Pandora Cinema

– Director: Richard Kelly
– Stacker score: 91
– Metascore: 88
– IMDb user rating: 8.0
– Runtime: 113 minutes
A modern cult classic if there ever was one, “Donnie Darko” tells the surreal tale of a teenage boy who narrowly escapes death, only to be haunted by visions of a man wearing a rabbit suit. Richard Kelly’s debut film is so heady in its delivery that entire websites are devoted to deciphering its meaning.
You may also like: Can you guess which iconic movie these scenes are from?
A woman unlocking handcuffs that connect her to a man.

Gaumont British Picture Corporation

– Director: Alfred Hitchcock
– Stacker score: 91
– Metascore: 93
– IMDb user rating: 7.6
– Runtime: 86 minutes
“It’s not much of an exaggeration to say that all contemporary escapist entertainment begins with ‘The 39 Steps,'” screenwriter Robert Towne once said. The story frames an innocent tourist (Robert Donat) for murder and embroils him in a deadly spy conspiracy. Subsequent Hitchcock works such as 1942’s “Saboteur” and 1959’s “North by Northwest” tackled similar themes and plot points.
A monster picking flowers with a little girl by a lake.

Universal Pictures

– Director: James Whale
– Stacker score: 91
– Metascore: 91
– IMDb user rating: 7.8
– Runtime: 70 minutes
This early adaptation of Mary Shelley’s classic novel turned Boris Karloff into one of the horror genre’s foremost stars. He plays Dr. Frankenstein’s monster, who escapes from the lab and unleashes chaos across the local countryside. This version would go on to inspire a plethora of “Frankenstein” sequels, remakes, spinoffs, and spoofs.
Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly speed down a road on horse and buggy.

Stanley Kramer Productions

– Director: Fred Zinnemann
– Stacker score: 91
– Metascore: 89
– IMDb user rating: 8.0
– Runtime: 85 minutes
Gary Cooper won his second Oscar playing a sheriff who reluctantly battles a gang of revenge-seeking killers in 1952’s “High Noon.” The famous film was directed by Fred Zinnemann, who nearly got run over by a train during the shoot.
Jessica Chastain in front of an American flag.

Columbia Pictures

– Director: Kathryn Bigelow
– Stacker score: 91
– Metascore: 95
– IMDb user rating: 7.4
– Runtime: 157 minutes
“Zero Dark Thirty” takes the 10-year-long manhunt for Osama bin Laden to the big screen. The movie follows the international search following the Sept. 11 attacks and culminates in his capture and death in Pakistan. It was nominated for five Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Actress for Jessica Chastain.
A man in a trench coat and hat with a gun in the air.

Euro International Film (EIA)

– Director: Jean-Pierre Melville
– Stacker score: 92
– Metascore: 91
– IMDb user rating: 7.9
– Runtime: 140 minutes
French criminal Corey is released from prison and vows never to wind up there again. A short-lived notion, he is dragged quickly back into a life of crime, plotting a diamond heist with an escaped murderer and a former policeman. The title of the film, which translates to “The Red Circle,” apparently comes from a Buddhist saying that means men who are destined to meet will inevitably meet.
You may also like: 100 best Western films of all time
Jeremy Renner in a space-like suit running from an explosion.

Voltage Pictures

– Director: Kathryn Bigelow
– Stacker score: 92
– Metascore: 95
– IMDb user rating: 7.5
– Runtime: 131 minutes
Movies don’t get much more straightforward in their intensity than Kathryn Bigelow’s “The Hurt Locker,” which follows a bomb squad sergeant as he dismantles explosives during the Iraq War. The film made history at the Academy Awards when Bigelow became the first woman to win the Best Director Oscar—one of six wins for the film.
Matt Damon and Martin Sheen talking in an office.

Warner Bros.

– Director: Martin Scorsese
– Stacker score: 92
– Metascore: 85
– IMDb user rating: 8.5
– Runtime: 151 minutes
Matt Damon and Leonardo DiCaprio play undercover agents on opposite sides of the law in Martin Scorsese’s “The Departed.” The movie was a star-studded affair, to say the least, with about half the $90 million budget going toward actors’ salaries.
A man pointing a long gun from a classic convertible car in black and white.

Harris-Kubrick Productions

– Director: Stanley Kubrick
– Stacker score: 92
– Metascore: 91
– IMDb user rating: 8.0
– Runtime: 84 minutes
Kubrick’s noirish thriller revolves around double-crossing criminals and a dangerous racetrack robbery. The film’s tight pacing, gritty characters, and nonlinear narrative injected new life into the heist subgenre. Director Quentin Tarantino cited it as an influence when making “Reservoir Dogs.”
A man with a shaved head and blood spatter on his shirt stands next to a small car with another man looking on behind him.

Jar Pictures

– Director: Anurag Kashyap
– Stacker score: 92
– Metascore: 89
– IMDb user rating: 8.2
– Runtime: 321 minutes
“Gangs of Wasseypur” is an Indian crime film that centers around power struggles and politics between three coal industry

source

About gracia

Check Also

"This Dish Is Hugely Underrated": People Are Sharing The Recipes From Their Cultures That All Food Lovers Should Try – BuzzFeed

“This Dish Is Hugely Underrated”: People Are Sharing The Recipes From Their Cultures That All …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *