René Gavira Segreste, one of the architects of the multimillion-dollar embezzlement in Segalmex, arrested



One of the architects of the multimillion-dollar embezzlement in Mexican Food Security, René Gavira Segreste, was arrested this Thursday in the United States. His name appeared this afternoon in the National Detention Registry, as a prisoner in transfer. Gavira Segreste held the position of director of Administration and Finance in the organization created by Andrés Manuel López Obrador to provide food to the poorest sectors of Mexican society. Under his direction, the amount of money that disappeared from public coffers exceeded 12.9 billion pesos, according to the count made by the Superior Audit of the Federation. The former official left his position in July 2020, surrounded by numerous allegations of corruption. The detainee faces charges of organized crime and operations with resources of illicit origin.

The Attorney General’s Office (FGR) announced through social networks early this Thursday afternoon that the detainee was already in its facilities. Gavira Segreste had been wanted since March of this year, when the justice system issued an arrest warrant for him along with that of 21 other people. The authorities accused them of having entered into illegal contracts and illicit payments of 142 million pesos, to supposedly acquire some 7,840 tons of sugar, but that they were never able to prove that they had been delivered to the state company.

The former official arrested this Thursday was one of the leaders of the scheme that operated and looted Segalmex accounts. Manuel Lozano Jiménez, the organization’s former commercial director, also works alongside him. Both operated below Ignacio Ovalle, an official appointed by Andrés Manuel López Obrador who was also a kind of political godfather to the president. The FGR, however, never focused the investigations on Ovalle and the president justified that he had not acted in bad faith, but rather that he had been deceived by a group of PRI members with “bad tricks.”

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